4 lost Technologies that still baffle modern scientists

There’s no denying that we’re currently at our most technologically advanced, but that does not necessarily meant that it’s always a forward progression. There are technologies that were lost to time and have yet to be rediscovered by modern science, such as:

 

1.   Greek Fire

 

photo from en.wikipedia.com

photo from en.wikipedia.com

 

This is easily the most famous of lost technologies: a kind of fire used by the military of the Byzantine Empire, which had the ability to burn even in water. The use of Greek fire waned after the decline of the Byzantine Empire, and its chemical composition was lost to obscurity.

 

2.   The Telharmonium

 

photo from: earlyradiohistory.us

photo from: earlyradiohistory.us

 

The Telharmonium is usually credited as the precursor to modern electronic musical instrument. It is a large organ invented in 1897, which relies on tone wheels to create synthetic musical notes, which is then transmitted to a series of loudspeakers via wires. Unfortunately, it required electricity in amounts that would strain early power grids. Manufacture of the device was stopped.

 

3.  Silphium

 

photo from: mosesjewelers.com

photo from: mosesjewelers.com

 

Silphium was a wonder drug that the Romans used to treat a wide variety of ailments, including warts, fever, indigestion, and other ailments. However, it was made from a genus of plant that grew in one specific area along the Mediterranean in North Africa. Huge demand led to over-harvesting, which led to the plant’s extinction.

 

4.   Damascus Steel

 

photo from: smes.co.in

photo from: smes.co.in

 

Damascus steel was a type of metal that was used for bladed weapons in the middle east during the early 1100s. It is known for its patterned blade, which is also said to be responsible for the blade being exceptionally sharp and flexible. The process used to forge Damascus steel was lost sometime around 1750 AD, and modern blacksmiths have yet to reproduce the process.

 



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